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Archive for the ‘Ajax’ Category

There are at least five ways to make AJAX calls with the jQuery library. For beginners, however, the differences between each can be a bit confusing. In this tutorial, we’ll line them up and make a comparison. Additionally. we’ll review how to inspect these AJAX calls with Firebug as well.

Tutorial Details

  • Program: jQuery
  • Difficulty: Beginner
  • Estimated Completion Time: 20 minutes

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When used correctly, jQuery can help you make your website more interactive, interesting and exciting. This article will share some best practices and examples for using the popular Javascript framework to create unobtrusive, accessible DOM scripting effects. The article will explore what constitutes best practices with regard to Javascript and, furthermore, why jQuery is a good choice of a framework to implement best practices.

[Offtopic: by the way, did you know that we are publishing a Smashing eBook Series? The brand new eBook #3 is Mastering Photoshop For Web Design, written by our Photoshop-expert Thomas Giannattasio.]

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Since google introduced the autosuggest or autocomplete search form on their toolbar everyone started looking for this piece of code to put on their websites. It’s not new in the Ajax world but it’s not seen as often as it should if you ask me. Why? It’s hard to find good examples or examples that match everyone’s needs. An Ajax autosuggest script is supposed to help the visitor and present in real time (as they type) some possible results based on their entered words/characters. In my opinion, this is a great feature to enhance the user experience. It’s not hard to build an autocomplete search form. In fact, it’s very easy. Our application will use script.aculo.us which is a rich Javascript library for the Ajax effect, an index page that will hold the search form and a response page that will perform the

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On one of my web projects I’ve been working on, we needed to allow the user to edit some information on their profile page. I could have written an HTML form page and then written the php database updater, but why use such outdated interfaces? This is the era of AJAX, and you can’t deny it. AJAX is pretty sweet. I decided on using flickr-like editing boxes to do the job. If you are not familiar with how flickr handles editing data, here’s a short summary.

  1. Show user the data field normally (for instance: the title of a picture)
  2. When mouse rolls over that title, make the background of the word yellow
  3. If the user clicks on the word, change that word to a input box with the word in it. Also show a “save” and “cancel” button
  4. A user can rename the picture and then push “save.”
  5. Run a little script that updates the name into the database
  6. Remove the input box and the buttons and return to the original title display (updated with new title).

 

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This aims to be the easiest possible example demonstrating AJAX (Asynchronous JavaScript and XML).

AJAX is a technique rather than a technology: It describes how JavaScript can be used to pull data from the server using the XML HTTP Request object and then insert this data into the website using DOM. This is done asynchronously – that is, in the background, without having to refresh the whole page. The technology which AJAX is based on has already been available for a while, the combination is what makes it new.

You can try the examples online or download them and run them locally (except for the PHP script, that would require a webserver with PHP).

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AJAX stands for Asynchronous JavaScript And XML. Any server side technology that supports JavaScript also supports AJAX. AJAX is a browser technology, and is therefore independent of web server platforms.

In this article we will learn about what AJAX is, how it works, and how can we use AJAX with PHP. Please remember, AJAX is not a programming language, so you don’t have to learn any new technology. AJAX can be implemented by using existing standards (JavaScript and XML) in a different way.

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Last week I wrote a simple WhereAreYou? application that used the Google Ajax APIs ClientLocation API to access your location via your IP address.

At the same time, we announced support for the Gears Geolocation API that can calculate your address using a GPS device, WiFi info, cell tower ids, and IP address lookups.

Add to all of that, the W3C Geolocation API that Andrei Popescu of the Gears team is editing. You will notice that it looks similar to the Gears API, with subtle differences. The ClientLocation API is quite different.

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