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Archive for the ‘IIS’ Category

This tutorial provides you with a high-level overview of ASP.NET MVC models, views, and controllers. In other words, it explains the ‘M’, ‘V’, and ‘C’ in ASP.NET MVC.

After reading this tutorial, you should understand how the different parts of an ASP.NET MVC application work together. You should also understand how the architecture of an ASP.NET MVC application differs from an ASP.NET Web Forms application or Active Server Pages application.

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The ASP.NET MVC framework depends on ASP.NET Routing to route browser requests to controller actions. In order to take advantage of ASP.NET Routing, you might have to perform additional configuration steps on your web server. It all depends on the version of Internet Information Services (IIS) and the request processing mode for your application.

Here’s a summary of the different versions of IIS:

  • IIS 7.0 (integrated mode) – No special configuration necessary to use ASP.NET Routing.
  • IIS 7.0 (classic mode) – You need to perform special configuration to use ASP.NET Routing.
  • IIS 6.0 or below – You need to perform special configuration to use ASP.NET Routing.

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 A few people have pinged me over the last week asking about how to use VS 2005 with an IIS 7.0 web-site on Windows Vista.  Specifically, they’ve run into an issue where they see a dialog message asking them to install the FrontPage Server Extensions, or they get a “You must be a member of the administrators group” message when they try to connect (see dialog below): (more…)

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 Here is the latest in my link-listing series.  Also check out my ASP.NET Tips, Tricks and Tutorials page and Silverlight Tutorials page for links to popular articles I’ve done myself in the past. (more…)

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The following scenarios establish the way the process identity and the thread identity are defined while building asp.net websites and publishing using the IIS webserver.

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Canonical URLs help you to make your links Search Engine Optimized (SEO). For human it is easy to understand that http://www.live.com is same as http://live.com. But many search engines will not make this assumption and treat them as two separate entries. This will split the rankings among them and lower the overall relevance of the site.

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